Neumarkt Sex

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Neumarkt Sex

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Brass brooch from Tomintoul in the eastern highlands of Scotland. Silver and niello brooch from Kengharair on the Isle of Mull. Silver and niello brooch from Ballachulish; b.

Table 2. Table 6. Table 8. Preface It was surprising to us both when we found out that, having studied for our Masters degrees together, we were both undertaking PhD research into Anglo-Saxon brooches: Toby looking at the cruciform brooches of the early Anglo-Saxon period and Rosie considering the brooches of the later Anglo-Saxon period.

As our research progressed we found we were covering similar topics concerning how dress and dress accessories were especially well placed to not only communicate aspects of individual and group identity but also to create that social reality.

While we were stimulated by discussions of such matters occurring both within and beyond the field of archaeology, we became frustrated on two levels: first by the lack of communication between researchers of different periods, and second by the lack of archaeological engagement with relevant work happening in other disciplines.

We wanted to know how prehistorians thought about dress, how dress historians dealt with material culture, and what archaeology would look like through the lens of Fashion Studies.

All groups were dealing with similar source material, albeit from different contexts and time periods, but were the questions we were all asking the same?

In order to satisfy our own curiosity, we held a conference in called Rags and Riches: Dress and Dress Accessories in Social Context with the aim of bringing together archaeologists, historians, and others from related disciplines, regardless of their period of study, to discuss current issues of methodology, theory and interpretation of dress.

When the call for papers went out we received over 70 abstracts, a sure sign of the liveliness of the field of dress studies in its broadest sense.

Through our very diverse program of speakers, the day-long conference facilitated a multidisciplinary dialogue between researchers studying both historic and contemporary modes of dress.

We began using these ideas in our own work, and thought more about how archaeologists could incorporate these ideas into their interpretations of the physical remains of dress that are preserved in the archaeological record.

This led to the creation of a session at the Theoretical Archaeology Group Conference also in , called Dressing Sensibly: Sensory Approaches to Dress for Archaeologists.

Inspired by the work of modern fashion theorists who spoke at our original conference, this session focused on the object-body relationships that we felt were less fully explored within archaeology.

The volume you have before you now is therefore not an account of the proceedings of either of these events, but this background was fundamental to the topics we decided to include here.

We hope that it will spark new ways forward not just for our own field, but also for those who think about dress outside of archaeology.

Toby F. From this time on brooches are consistently part of the panoply of metal objects recovered from British sites. From the fifth to second centuries BC they are found in burials, in settlement sites in occupation deposits and pits, and as isolated finds in the landscape.

They are small objects that could be clasped to a garment and are shaped in repeated forms although each example is unique and individually crafted.

The similarity of form between each brooch, their associations with people through use and deposition, their small personal size and their broad distribution makes them an ideal subject through which to consider and compare their role in dress, personal presentation and, by extension, identity in this period.

The earliest designs share many common traits with examples found on the near continent, yet brooches were in use in Europe for over half a millennium before they appear in Britain cf.

Marion ; Bietti Sestieri and Macnamara Although some of these earlier continental brooches are purported to have a British provenance not one has been recovered from a secure archaeological context.

The evidence instead indicates these arrived in Britain after the Iron Age and many appear to be antiquarian imports given artificial British provenances Hull and Hawkes , 7—8; Adams , —3.

Approximately brooches are known in England, Scotland and Wales from c. After this time the quantity increases dramatically with more than 15, brooches dating to the last century BC Mackreth Previous research on the social and personal significance of brooches in Britain has focussed on the Late Iron Age post BC e.

Fox ; Alexander ; Hill ; Hattatt ; ; ; ; Haselgrove ; Jundi and Hill ; Eckardt ; Mackreth This is in part owing to the increased quantity of finds relating to personal dress and adornment during that period.

Sophia Jundi and J. This chapter addresses the earlier evidence to question whether brooches can provide clues to the changing ways in which people presented themselves to others, which in turn might lead to insights about the idea of the individual.

I will examine the Early and Middle Iron Age brooches in Britain from c. By discussing this contextual evidence we may explore their significance in terms of personal identity and appearance.

This will demonstrate the value of Early and Middle Iron Age brooches in the study of dress and identity in Iron Age Britain. The focus rests primarily on brooches to address existing interpretations of the role of these objects and to provide a starting point for future comparisons across the entire Iron Age period which could incorporate other dress associated objects that have been excluded from this chapter owing to the demands of space.

Early and Middle Iron Age brooches The earliest form of brooch found and manufactured in Britain is the bronze bow brooch.

This consists of a pin to pierce the fabric, a convex, flat or concave bow parallel to the pin, a spring or hinge at the head of the brooch to create tension between the bow and pin enabling the brooch to be opened, and a catchplate at the foot of the brooch in which to insert the pin to hold the brooch shut Fig.

On Early Iron Age examples c. These have a high arched bow and large coiled springs Figs. Despite the similar overall shape to their Continental counterparts the British examples are often smaller and more simply decorated implying they are locally manufactured versions of the form.

Middle Iron Age brooches are as common in iron as bronze Adams , and the latter tend to be particularly small, c. From c. In the Middle Iron Age c. Adams , 22 fig.

Early Iron Age Type 1A brooch. Box, Wiltshire BM , Occasionally the bow, catchplate and foot are cast as a single solid piece See Type 2L, Fig.

British brooches become even more distinctive from Continental ones at this time. Insular types, that is those particular to Britain, include the concave bowed involuted brooches Type 2C, Fig.

Despite the chronological connections in the style of foot the earlier foot forms do continue into later phases so this feature alone cannot be a precise chronological indicator.

During the Middle Iron Age c. These become even more common in later periods. The earliest plate forms consist of an upper surface that is visible when attached to cloth.

This is the shaped, decorative part or plate. It hides the hinged pin mechanism attached to the back of the brooch.

They tend to be of moulded bulbous shapes or inlaid with other materials such as coral Adams , 64—8. Early and Middle Iron Age brooches have been found in burials brooches at 23 sites in settlements 74 brooches at 44 sites , at hillforts 94 brooches at 32 sites , in watery locations, typically riverine inter-tidal zones 35 brooches from 12 sites , at dryland ritualised contexts disassociated from settlement or subsistence activity 93 brooches from 9 sites and occasionally on Late Iron Age and Roman period sites 14 brooches from 11 sites Adams , , see Figs.

Over brooches of definite Early Iron Age type have been recorded but less than 50 were found during archaeological excavation. Personal objects and personal identity in the Iron Age Fig.

PAS: SWYOR ; Makeshift Cemetery, East Riding of Yorks BM, Personal objects and personal identity in the Iron Age 53 Fig. The Thames has been treated as four findspots: the City, East London, West London and upstream west of London.

Scheme Adams , , a number of these have landscape type or subsequent archaeological site associations. Greater numbers of Middle Iron Age brooches are found than in the preceding period and the majority of these out of brooches have been recovered from excavations.

The remainder of the brooches are in too fragmentary a state to assign to a specific Early or Middle Iron Age type. The greatest quantities of brooches from any type of feature are those from burials: were found in graves in cemeteries and one with a burial in a pit within the settlement at Slonk Hill, West Sussex Hartridge , Four of the brooches in burials are of Early Iron Age type the remainder are Middle Iron Age.

The burial evidence is vital to our understanding of the relationship between brooches, dress and the body. It provides the closest direct association of brooches with the human body and clothing for a time when we lack contemporary written descriptions and illustrations depicting people in Britain.

Even then we must be cautious in equating the burial evidence, the fabric and accoutrements from graves, with the dress of the living, as discussed below.

Most Early and Middle Iron Age brooches entered the archaeological record separate from people. In Middle Iron Age settlements the features in which brooches are found are usually pits but at hillforts there is very little evidence for structured deposition of brooches in features.

Revised Early and Middle Iron Age data show these brooches are also rare finds in boundary features Adams , —5 contra to results achieved almost two decades ago Haselgrove , In fact brooches are most frequently recovered from general occupation layers: layers of material that have built up during settlement activity rather than being specifically laid down in a feature Adams , —5.

In these cases there is a physical separation of the brooch from the individual. Here 38 Middle Iron Age bronze brooches were found in an amorphous spread of material overlying a line of pits, containing complete pottery vessels, cut into a natural gulley down the side of a natural promontory Adams et al.

Similarities in the style and decoration of the brooches suggest they are all roughly contemporary. Social identities and brooches As visually complex objects, brooches could have been encoded with meaning not only in their form and decoration but also the materials from which they were made and how they were worn Wells , 40—1.

Alfred Gell warns us that objects and their decoration cannot be read like texts because they are not structured like language Gell , —5.

It is the physical properties of the object, its tactile qualities and location within the context of other Iron Age objects that formed the basis from which the object was understood.

Anthropological research on clothing has explored the complex relationship between dress and personal identity e.

Miller Yet as Joanna Brück has warned we should not imagine that all individuals in the past or present are free to act as they wish, such freedom of the individual is a European cultural construct since the eighteenth century Brück , 74—5.

Brooches as a part of Iron Age dress and as items connected to personal appearance are tied into these complex issues of personal presentation and representation.

Brooches in burials A general shift is visible during the Iron Age from brooches being exceptionally rare items in burials at the start of the period in the Early Iron Age see above , to being relatively common at the end, in the Late Iron Age e.

Fitzpatrick ; Mackreth Personal objects and personal identity in the Iron Age 55 However the pattern is not consistent across Britain hinting at the precedence of regional preferences.

Middle Iron Age brooches have been found in burials in England only, typically in the same regions which have evidence for a cemetery style funerary rite: in the East Riding of Yorkshire, Cornwall, Hampshire, Kent, Cambridgeshire, and Lincolnshire Fig.

The exception being the aforementioned burial in a pit at Slonk Hill, Sussex Hartridge , The evidence is concentrated on the Middle Iron Age cemeteries of the Yorkshire Wolds East Riding of Yorkshire but even here the brooch evidence is still limited.

Of the burials at the Wetwang Slack cemetery, only 41 contained bow brooches Dent , , We must remain cautious when extrapolating these modes of dress to the wider population especially considering the extremely small sample of the population that were buried in the ground and the even lower frequency of brooches in these graves.

The small numbers of brooches in burials across England at this time, especially in comparison to contemporary Continental cemeteries e.

Bretz Mahler ; Stead and Rigby ; Evans ; Desenne et al. As a result we cannot know for sure that the Suddern Farm brooch, for instance, is an anomaly or a significant adornment for the individual with whom it was buried but both the fact that this woman was buried in this way and with a brooch may be significant.

Iron brooches are more prevalent in burials than bronze brooches whereas the latter are more common in watery locations and dryland sites of a ritualised character.

The latter argument is not supported by the higher frequency of bronze brooches as single finds in the landscape nor does it take into consideration the higher probability that heavily corroded iron brooches are recovered from carefully excavated graves contexts compared to watery environments and metal-detected plough soil.

The choice of metal appears to reflect regional practices: the majority of burials containing brooches are in the Yorkshire Wolds in relatively close proximity to natural iron ore sources in particular the iron production centre of the Foulness Valley Halkon In contrast most of the brooches found in watery contexts are derived from the Thames and other southern waterways at some distance from the sources of copper and tin in western England, Wales and across the Channel.

Bronze brooches also appear to be preferred for deposition at sites set apart from settlement activity, without human burials but with organised, ritualised, deposition of specific complete artefacts such as Grandcourt Farm, Middleton, Norfolk.

Personal objects and personal identity in the Iron Age 57 located in areas where contemporary brooches are not found in burials Figs.

Beyond Yorkshire, bronze brooches are almost as common in burials as iron brooches eight bronze to nine iron.

The people of the Yorkshire Wolds were making use of locally available and locally significant materials. Perhaps it is significant that ritually deposited brooches were of these non-local materials while in the Yorkshire Wolds the connection between local people and the value of their local resources was highlighted in the brooches in the burials.

But, this does not account for the rarity of bronze brooches here or their more frequent presence in burials elsewhere in England.

No simple equation can be drawn between the relative richness of the grave and the inclusion of a brooch of a particular metal.

But it is interesting to note that brooches decorated with additional materials, such as opaque glass Fig. Just over half of the 80 brooches decorated in this manner have been found in burial contexts Adams , Of the eight coral-inlaid brooches in non-burial contexts, two were found in specific features relating to ramparts: one at Castle Yard, Farthingstone in a deposit of collapsed rampart material Knight , 26—7 , and the other was disturbed from the rampart bank at Maiden Castle, Dorset Wheeler , A further example was recovered from Harborough Cave, Derbyshire Fig.

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